Order directly from the publisher 1-800-226-3822

Cloth: $24.95 ISBN: 0-8130-1803

Orange Pulp is a  stylish, engaging collection that belongs on everybody's night stand. Each story sizzles and pops with Florida's raunchy, intoxicating heat. This is great fun," Carl Hiaasen.

"Ah, Florida's growing cash crop-scumbags in paradise. With Orange Pulp, Glassman and O'Sullivan again make the case that the Sunshine State need not look to L.A., or even past the azaleas, for the next noir fix. The 'lost' Willeford piece alone is worth the price of admission," Tim Dorsey, author of Florida Roadkill and Hammerhead Ranch Motel.

"Brilliant . . . Orange Pulp is the most original collection of mystery short stories, and selections of novels, I have ever read. The orange is as dark as the moon in eclipse and the pulp is as tasty as a long-forgotten dream that suddenly returns. Read it. Treasure it," Stuart M. Kaminsky, Edgar Award winner and author of Vengeance.

"It's about time someone gathered a full collection of the writing about the dark side of the Sunshine State,"  George H. Meyer, author of Kill the Landlord.

"This collection brings together for the first time a good sample of the many stories that have made Florida such a natural, popular setting for mysteries. The editors have made available rather inaccessible stories and novels that will entertain mystery lovers for quite a while," Kevin McCarthy, University of Florida

Orange Pulp is an anthology of crime, of heroes and villains, and it celebrates the murder mystery. The writers--creators of the genre sometimes called "American noir"--including John D. MacDonald and Charles Willeford, helped Florida become a serious contender for the title of crime fiction capital of America.

Even the most devoted aficionados of the genre have rarely encountered the kind of nonstop action concocted by the reclusive founder of the American hard-boiled mystery, Carroll John Daly; the comic elegance of Jonathan Latimer; or the eclectic world of Mike Shayne in Brett Halliday's classic series. Orange Pulp also includes Mary Roberts Rinehart's only Florida story, Edwin Granberry's brilliantly realized account of an execution, and a tribute to the ecological concerns of John D. MacDonald, whose work transformed the Florida pulps into a true art.

The editors begin with a comprehensive survey of Florida crime fiction and provide generous introductions to each individual author. The book includes two special bonuses: the complete text of The Hated One by Don Tracy, a riveting novel of murder, race, and culture that has been out of print for decades, and the opening to an unfinished work by Charles Willeford, creator of the classic Hoke Moseley novels such as Miami Blues and Sideswipe.

With work by legendary pioneers from the golden age of pulp fiction, this collection reveals a rich and popular--though often overlooked--tradition of mystery writing in the Sunshine State.

Contributors:
Carroll John Daly, Edwin Granberry, Jonathan Latimer, Brett Halliday, Mary Roberts Rinehart, John D. MacDonald, Stephen Ransome, Charles Willeford, and Don Tracy.

Amazon.com review:
After World War I the dime novel was quickly usurped by mass fiction magazines that were typically printed on cheap, rough paper--called pulps. Pulp, over time, became synonymous with genre crime fiction of the tough, dark, hard-boiled, noir variety. Orange Pulp is a collection of some of the pulps' better practitioners, either those who worked directly in the field, or who were heavily influenced by them. Further pulling them together are the stories' locale--Florida; in many cases the writers also lived, at least for a time, in Florida.

This collection includes novel excerpts, short stories, and a complete novel whose original publication dates range from 1929 to 1975. There is an excerpt from John D. MacDonald's A Flash of Green and two complete (and addictive) chapters from Brett Halliday's Dividend on Death featuring South Beach P.I. Michael Shayne. Jonathan Wyatt Latimer's The Dead Don't Care (Chapter 3) published in 1937 is a precursor to the witty, racing repartee of P.G. Wodehouse and Lawrence Block's Bernie the Burglar series. For the real collector there is a previously unpublished novel excerpt by Charles Willeford, The First Five in Line, which vaguely resembles Stephen King's The Running Man, and should give the producers of TV's "Survivor" and "Big Brother" an idea or two for a new show. The final work is a complete novel, The Hated One by Don Tracy, in which the alcoholic narrator returns to his hometown to find himself caught up in a racially charged murder trial reminiscent of To Kill a Mockingbird. This story--like all in the collection--is a gem.

What all the stories have in common--besides Florida and the pulp noir tradition--are sparkling writing, distinctive voices and compulsive readability.

Kirkus Review as posted on Barnes and Noble wesbsite:
Orange Pulp is an anthology of crime, of heroes and villains, and it celebrates the murder mystery. The writers, creators of the genre sometimes called "American noir"-including John D. MacDonald and Charles Willeford-helped Florida become a serious contender for the title of crime fiction capital of America.

Even the most devoted aficionados of the genre have rarely encountered the kind of nonstop action concocted by the reclusive founder of the American hard-boiled mystery, Carroll John Daly; the comic elegance of Jonathan Latimer; or the eclectic world of Mike Shayne in Brett Halliday's classic series. Orange Pulp also includes Mary Roberts Rinehart's only Florida story, Edwin Granberry's brilliantly realized account of an execution, and a tribute to the ecological concerns of John D. MacDonald, whose work transformed the Florida pulps into a true art.

The editors begin with a comprehensive survey of Florida crime fiction and provide generous introductions to each individual author. The book includes two special bonuses: the complete text of The Hated One by Don Tracy, a riveting novel of murder, race, and culture that has been out of print for decades, and the opening to an unfinished work by Charles Willeford, creator of the classic Hoke Moseley novels such as Miami Blues and Sideswipe.

With work by legendary pioneers from the golden age of pulp fiction, this collection reveals a rich and popular-through often overlooked-tradition of mystery writing in the Sunshine State.

Maurice O'Sullivan is Kenneth Curry Chair of Literature and chair of the English Department at Rollins College, Winter Park, Florida. He is the coeditor of The Florida Reader and (with Steve Glassman) of Crime Fiction and Film in the Sunshine State (an Edgar finalist in 1998).

Steve Glassman is associate professor in the Department of Humanities at Embry-Riddle University, Daytona Beach, Florida. He is author of the novel Blood on the Moon, coeditor of Zora in Florida (UPF, 1991), and (with Maurice O'Sullivan) coeditor of Crime Fiction and Film in the Sunshine State

 

The Bookshelf

Selections on the arts, culture and history

A taste of Florida noir

It was a dark and rainy night. The kind that makes you want to stay inside and curl up with a good detective novel. I was alone but not lonely. I wasn’t good at it, but I was learning.

Actually, I wasn’t exactly alone either. John D. Macdonald was there. And Charles Willeford. And Stephen Ransome. And Brett Halliday. And the others. And they didn’t care about the dark or the rain … or the dame. The stories were the thing. They had to be told. And I was in a mood to listen.

I knew I’d have to thank Maurice O’Sullivan and Steve Glassman, a couple of college profs with a healthy interest in homicide and a yen for a good story. They brought these mavens of murder together in Orange Pulp, Stories of Mayhem, Murder and Mystery. This was clearly a labor of love. I knew their collection of Florida pulp must be huge. But I had to read on and find out what they knew.

A lot of this stuff isn’t available anymore. I figured that. You don’t see it on the shelf at your neighborhood Barnes & Noble. So if I was going to read John Carroll Daly or Edwin Granberry or Don Tracy it was going to be here. Only here. Unless I could convince Maurice O’Sullivan to let me look at his files. But that would have to wait.

 I turned a page and an old friend appeared. Mary. Mary Roberts Rinehart. She’d been dead since ’58, but I’d encountered her in the ’70s on a visit to Cabbage Key off Florida’s  wrote there. And here in Orange Pulp was Rinehart’s only Florida story, Murder and the South Wind. Complete. Nothing cut. The way it should be.

But there wasn’t time to tarry. I had lots to cover before dawn. I knew I’d found murder mystery heaven. I should have known it was too good to last. Wham! The next one was a disappointment. Not because of the quality. Just the quantity. Or lack of it. It was an excerpt from John D. Macdonald’s A Flash of Green. The passage brought back a torrent of memories, like a gorgeous redhead with too much passion and not enough time. Just enough to whet the appetite. I had my own copy of A Flash of Green. I knew I’d have to reread the whole thing later.

But just like with the gorgeous redhead, I knew the score. No expectations, no demands. A little John D. is better than no John D. at all. It was a little before 4 a.m. when I finished. The rain had stopped, but it was still dark out – black as the inside of Moriarty’s heart. Still, I had more optimism than sense. I figured there’s bound to be an Orange Pulp 2.

– T. Allan Smith

 T. Allan Smith is editor of O! Arts Magazine, and has a passion for all things Florida, noir novels and gorgeous redheads.

 Published in O! Arts Magazine, April-May 2001

Used with permission.

Florida crime and all its juice

By PAUL A. BERGIN

© St. Petersburg Times, published October 29, 2000


By now, only the most blissfully uninformed would dispute the notion that the most vital and important community of crime fiction writers in the world resides in Florida. From the bestseller lists to the legion of important mid-list authors who test the limits of the genre with each new book, the evidence is overwhelming. Los Angeles and New York each enjoyed periods of primacy. But since 1964, when Travis McGee first sallied forth in determined search of salvage, the influence and appeal of the Florida crime story has grown until it is now as ubiquitous as the locked room mystery once was.

Less well established, perhaps, is the idea that this is not an accidental development, but the inevitable result of a lengthy and rich tradition of Florida crime writing with roots in the pulp magazines of the Depression Era. With Orange Pulp, a collection of excerpts, short stories, and one complete novel, 1998 Edgar nominees Maurice J. O'Sullivan and Steve Glassman attempt to establish and illustrate that heritage. For the most part, they succeed.

In one respect, they succeed brilliantly. The inclusion of the complete text of The Hated One, Don Tracy's long out-of-print novel of rednecks, race and regret, will occasion joy in the breast of any serious aficionado of Florida crime fiction. Combining a deeply flawed protagonist, unpolished but compelling prose, and a theme of racial injustice that, in 1963, was only beginning to gain currency, The Hated One succeeds both as a novel and as a bridge between the pulp writing of the past and the more thoughtful, fully realized Florida novels that were then beginning to appear in hardcover and as paperback originals.

Another important selection is The First Five in Line, a previously unpublished fragment (and all that exists) of a 1975 novel subsequently abandoned by Charles Willeford. Mordantly funny and breezily self-assured, Willeford's savage satire today seems nearly prophetic in light of developments in television "reality programming." Orange Pulp's remaining seven selections are less inspired, but will be of interest to individuals desiring a quick overview of the history of Florida crime writing. Included are short stories by Edwin Granberry and Mary Roberts Rinehart and excerpts from novels by Carroll John Daly, Jonathan Latimer, Brett Halliday, John D. MacDonald and Stephen Ransome. The Rinehart story is the only work she ever set in Florida, and its inclusion as representative is baffling, but otherwise the editors' author choices are well reasoned and defensible.

Their decision, however, to use excerpts of longer works, rather than self-contained and readily available pieces by represented authors or equivalent talents, is troublesome. It makes one wonder if Orange Pulp is meant as an anthology with popular appeal or as a textbook for a college survey course. Such vagueness of purpose will limit Orange Pulp's commercial potential, but it's a flaw that is unlikely to prove fatal. Florida crime fiction is the sine qua non of contemporary American blood writing and Orange Pulp, its faults notwithstanding, is a volume of substantial worth to anyone seeking to understand its development.

- Paul A. Bergin is a writer who lives in Sarasota.

Orange Pulp

Edited by Maurice J. O'Sullivan and Steve Glassman

University Press of Florida, $24.95

 

Order directly from the publisher 1-800-226-3822

Cloth: $24.95 ISBN: 0-8130-1803

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